The Biggest Failures in Consumer Audio/Video Electronics History

Discussion in 'Hardware Lounge' started by capsuleri, Feb 1, 2018.

  1. capsuleri

    capsuleri Well-Known Member War Zone Member

    An interesting read, brought back memories - The Biggest Failures in Consumer Audio/Video Electronics History

    I remember my first attempt - adding a rear channel with two 4 ohm speakers in series and hooking it up to the B speaker outputs of my Marantz receiver circa 1977. Did help a tiny bit with certain recordings. Later added a quadrial adapter to the receiver and it was barely better.

    Did not remember the Finial Laser Turntable from 1986. I think there might be a market for it today if the limitations can be worked out.

    Of course everyone remember the Betamax vs VHS format battle.
     
  2. Phil A

    Phil A Well-Known Member Top Poster

    I remember them all. A couple of years back I got rid of my two LD players and 140 or so LDs. I still like 3D. My main system projector is 3D and the UHD TV I have in a back-up system will also do 3D.
     
  3. capsuleri

    capsuleri Well-Known Member War Zone Member

    I just remembered I still have the Carver C-9 hologram generator adapter in it's original box. .
     
  4. Denton

    Denton Well-Known Member Donor War Zone Member Top Poster

    There is likely STILL a market for that one. EBay?
     
  5. Mike B

    Mike B Well-Known Member Donor War Zone Member Top Poster

    I did good and avoided all of those clinkers.
     
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  6. Phil A

    Phil A Well-Known Member Top Poster

    I still have one. I had one when they were first out and then sold it and then many years later bought a couple of used ones. In my old house I had one in the basement system and one upstairs in the main system. When I moved, I was going to simplify the main system and a friend helped me pack my speakers (would not have been able to do it myself) and load them in the car. He wanted one so I gave one to him. I have a CD with tracks and maybe once a year or so I do a demo for someone. There was person on Audiogon at one point upgrading those (better RCAs and other stuff) and I was tempted but I don't really use it enough. They probably go from anywhere to just under $100 or just over it on eBay.
     
  7. DustinDavis

    DustinDavis Well-Known Member War Zone Member

    Neat read. Dicey start. "Let's get our list of commercial failures started with 8 tracks, which were widely successful and adopted by manufacturers and consumers."
     
  8. Mike B

    Mike B Well-Known Member Donor War Zone Member Top Poster

    Lear Jet 8 Track.

    Pops got one on approval. Pause, cluck, resume. He sent it back. Garbage.
     
  9. DustinDavis

    DustinDavis Well-Known Member War Zone Member

    My dad had one in his Grand Prix. It was working when the car went to the junkyard. For some reason he kept the tapes for years after that.
     
  10. Mike B

    Mike B Well-Known Member Donor War Zone Member Top Poster

    And the tapes were huge. Enter cassette. Small tapes, good sound, no clunk.
     
  11. jasn

    jasn Well-Known Member Donor Top Poster

  12. Mikael Soderholm

    Mikael Soderholm Active Member Donor

    Semi-interesting article, and I don't agree all those products were failures. DAT, for instance, was (and perhaps still is) widely used in the recording business, even though it never became a big consumer product, but minidisc was quite big for a while.
    And, "The analog LP had superior sound. You just can’t digitize music, break it up into 1000’s of bits, then try to re-assemble it and expect that it will still sound like real music. It can’t. It doesn’t." is just plain wrong.
    You can prefer LPs for a number of reasons, but higher quality sound (meaning closer to the source) is not one of them, especially nowadays when recordings are all digital. The CD is closer to the master tape than the LP can ever hope to be.
     
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  13. DYohn

    DYohn Well-Known Member Donor

    8-track was not a failure, it was just superseded by compact cassettes. Laserdisc was not a failure, it lasted 20 years and was superseded by DVD. By the writer's logic in these two choices, black and white TV must have been a failure too.
     
  14. DYohn

    DYohn Well-Known Member Donor

    Great points. I missed that incorrect but often repeated BS abo0ut digital music. that statement alone makes me disregard the author as a wanna-be hack.
     
  15. CJ

    CJ Bronze Member Admin War Zone Member

    Top Poster Of Month

    No offense to Caps, this was still an interesting read but I hate the "listicles". Yes that's a term and it is the cancer of the internet. "Articles" that are just top X lists expanded a bit. Totally designed for the facebook era and frequently presented in those horrible "slide show" formats. Ugh.
     
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  16. DYohn

    DYohn Well-Known Member Donor

    I fall for those once in a while but once I get on the first page I realize what it is and abandon them. Fucking click-bait.
     
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  17. capsuleri

    capsuleri Well-Known Member War Zone Member

    Agreed this is totally NOT true. But that was the argument presented in early days of CDs by "audiophiles". The first gen CDs did sound rather bright and harsh. One reason for the harshness I read, because the engineers did not (de)compensate for RIAA boost for LPs recorded in the master tapes.
     
  18. capsuleri

    capsuleri Well-Known Member War Zone Member

    Perhaps the better description would be "eclipsed".
     
  19. DYohn

    DYohn Well-Known Member Donor

    That was part of it, and was the reason why so many CDs got released labeled "remastered." Many of us fell for thinking they were different from the vinyl original, but all it really meant was the RIAA compensation had been re-done. Another reason why some early CD players sounded harsh was the filter they used. Filter design got better very quickly and the early digital harshness disappeared (although once you tell people it's there a certain percentage of so-called audiophiles will ALWAYS think they hear it.)
     
  20. DYohn

    DYohn Well-Known Member Donor

    No, superseded was the correct word in my opinion. Once the better, more user-friendly technology was developed there was no reason to continue using the older one. The same could be said by CD over LP.
     

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